Simple Sugar-Free Banana Bread

Banana Bread

Who doesn’t love banana bread right? Well now you can enjoy a delicious slice of banana bread without the guilt. This recipe is completely sugar and flour free (apart from the natural sugars from the bananas) meaning lower carbohydrate, leaving room for more nutritious ingredients.

This recipe is also dairy free and gluten free.

Banana Bread

2 medium bananas, ripe

3 eggs

2 tbsp coconut or olive oil

Water

½ cup xylitol

2 cups almond meal or flax meal

1 tbsp baking powder (gluten free for those avoiding gluten)

1 tsp vanilla essence

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 c walnuts chopped (optional)

 

Preheat oven toOnline Nutritionist 180 degrees fan forced. Oil a loaf pan.

Use a shaker or two cup measuring cup for wet ingredients and a bowl for dry ingredients.

Mash bananas in a separate bowl with a folk and put into the 2 cup container. Mix or shake.

Add all wet ingredients to the bananas and make it up to two cups by adding water.

Combine all dry ingredients in a mixing bowl and add wet ingredients, beat for 2-3 minutes, stir in walnuts if using them.

Pour the batter into the loaf pan and smooth the top.

Bake for 45-55 minutes or until a folk inserted comes out clean.

Allow to completely cool and cut into 1cm slices and wrap in alfoil and sandwich bag for work.

Store in freezer for longer term consumption.

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice

Cauliflower is extremely versatile and can be swapped out for cheeses in baked dishes or for rice.

Not to mention it is extremely nutritious!

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

1 head large cauliflower chopped in a blender or grated to resemble rice.

I added ¼ cup of mint into the blender but you can shred it and mix it through if grating.

1 cup thinly chopped green spring onion

2 cups mixed green, yellow, orange and red capsicumClinical Dietitian

250g roasted pumpkin cubed (optional)

½ head broccoli broken up into tiny florets

4 button mushrooms or other Asian mushrooms to mix it up

4 garlic cloves diced

1 onion diced

1 chicken breast roasted with olive oil, salt and pepper and cubed after being cooked.

2 tbsp. good quality tamarind soy sauce.

5 anchovies chopped up (you don’t taste them but they are optional)

Black pepper to taste

A handful of pepitas

Handful of cashews

 

Add garlic, onion, caClinical Nutritionpsicum, mushrooms into a wok with 2 tbsp olive oil and sauté until fragrant.

Add cauliflower mint rice mixture and mix through until evenly distributed. 

Add in broccoli, diced chicken, anchovies and pepper. Stir through.

Add in the tamarind soy sauce and stir through until the whole batch turns a slightly brownish colour, as pictured.

Serve in a shallow bowl topped with pepitas and cashews.

 

 

Clean Orange, Poppy Seed & Pistachio Muffins

Orange poppy seed pistachio muffins

We all love muffins and they are often a convenient and yummy snack option. However, they often come with a hefty, less than nutritious caloric profile and this can impact both our waistline and overall health. Thankfully, there are raw ingredient options available to us to boost their nutritional profile and reduce poor quality calories.

Clean Orange, Poppy Seed & Pistachio Muffins

 

Ingredients

 

100g pistachios (unsalted), & an extra 1 ½ tbsp. chopped (for decoration).

100g almond flour/meal (if you don’t have any on hand, put 50g almonds in a food processor and grind down)

50g coconut flour.

60g rapadura sugar (or xylitol if you are looking to cut down on sugar)

1 tsp baking powder

1 pinch sea salt or Celtic salt or Himalayan salt

Zest of one orange + juice of 1 fresh orange.

1 tbsp. poppy seeds, plus 1 tsp additional for decoration

60mL almond milk

4 lightly beaten large eggs

3 tbsp. walnut, hazelnut or almond oil (or olive oil if neither are available to you)

1 tsp vanilla bean paste/extract

1 tsp ground cinnamon

 

Method

 

Preheat oven to 180⁰C. Line 10 spaces of a muffin tin with muffin cases.

Place 100g of pistachios in a food processor or blender and process until fine.

Place ground pistachios into a large bowl and stir in other dry ingredients as well as the orange zest.

Squeeze orange juice into a measuring cup and add almond milk up to 175mL. Pour mixture over dry ingredients and add eggs, oil and vanilla. Stir until smooth.

Spoon mixture into prepared muffin cases, top with designated decorative pistachios and poppy seeds.

Bake for 25-30 mins or until a fork or skewer comes out clean.

Leave to cool.

Transfer into an airtight container for storage in the fridge or freezer if left for more than 4 days.

Diet Consultation

 

IBS: Gut Problems Got You Beat?

Diet Consultation IBS

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Do you suffer from the following?

IBS

Gas
Bloating
Sore or upset stomach
Fatigue
Nausea
Irritability
Reflux or heartburn

Digestive Enzymes and IBS Type Symptoms

If you are suffering from one or more of the above digestive complaints, it is possible that you are lacking vital enzymes.

Digestive enzymes play a pivotal role in how the food we eat is broken down, digested, absorbed and used. These special little fellows occupy our digestion from our mouth (tongue) right through to our large intestine.

They are also present within our blood, assisting in anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic reactions, but that is a topic for another time.

Many things are known to deplete the number of digestive enzymes we secrete including, insufficient/incorrect pH environment for their survival and activation, tissue trauma to a secreting organ such as the pancreas, chemicals and pesticides stripping them from our plant foods, medications, drinking around food times, excessive intake of saturated and hydrogenated fats, fluorinated water, microwaving foods, heavy metals, dental fillings and pasteurisation.

As you can see, what happens to our foods has a lot to do with the number of enzymes that are viable to our body.

There are certain foods that are naturally designed to possess larger qualities of enzymes, but sometimes, eating enough of these at each meal can be a difficult task.

Sometimes the use of digestive enzyme supplements can fill this dietary gap.

But which enzymes are best for you? When do you take them? There are so many on the market, which provide the most benefit to your symptoms? It is important to speak with a dietary specialist to help determine the best fit for dietary intake of enzymatic foods as well as supplementation.

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