Sweet Gold – Sweet Potato

Sweet potato fries

Sweet Gold – Sweet Potato

Household favourite, sweet potato is more than just a delicious addition to any meal or sweet treat. The golden root vegetable holds an abundance of phytonutrients. From its skin, deep into its sweet flesh.

It holds the phytochemical antioxidant anthocyanin within its skin, responsible for its ability to reduce oxidative damage and increase the absorption of the all-important vitamin A.  Prevention of oxidative damage has been shown to reduce carcinogenic activities, inflammation and fight fatigue.

There has also been research demonstrating great promise in its ability to address alcoholic fatty liver and cholesterol induced atherosclerosis, what a powerhouse!

Sweet potato around the world

In Asian countries such as Japan, sweet potatoes are praised for their benefits in the treatment of diabetes and some cancers. Sweet potatoes have also been used in some countries to encourage weight loss and in support of hormonal replacement therapies, awarding to the vegetables phytoestrogen content.

What have we learnt?

Sweet potato is utilised around the world as a dietary support for:

What else is sweet potato good for?

  • The bright golden/orange colour of the humble sweet potato gives us clues as to its high antioxidant content, specifically beta-carotene. Antioxidants are essential for the healthy function of almost every system in our body, including the repair of new skin cells for a beautiful, glowing complexion.
  • The skins and flesh of sweet potatoes are also fantastic sources of fibre and complex carbohydrates which help to sustain energy, keep us feeling fuller for longer and regulate bowel motions.
  • Apart from vitamin A, sweet potatoes are rich in other vitamins and minerals that sustain our energy levels ensure a healthy nervous system.

A versatile gift from nature

Sweet potatoes can be prepared and enjoyed in many ways. Its versatility lends itself to both sweet and savoury meals.

Some examples include:

Sweet potato savoury muffins

Vegetable Lasagne (layer baked sweet potato in place of pasta)

Sweet potato brownies

Sweet potato fish cakes

Vegetable burger patties

Baked sweet potato chips or wedges

Warming sweet potato soups

Stuffed sweet potato

Sweet potato bubble and squeak mini hash browns  

Goss on Detox – Is it for you?

The Goss on Detox

Fatigue, Bowel Irritation, Bloating, Gas, Food Sensitives, Tummy Cramps

Bad Breath, Allergies, Abdominal Pain, Excess Fluid, Eczema, Dermatitis

Do any of these sound like you?

A detox may be your key to ridding these uncomfortable bodily ailments.

First of all.. what are toxins? 

Toxins are poisonous substances produced by almost everything we come into contact with…

The Importance of Detoxing

Our body has an amazing natural ability to process and eliminate toxins within itself. These toxins can come from a range of environmental sources, such as, breathing in chemicals, pollution, heavy metals, harmful cosmetic products, alcohol, parasites, food and medications. Toxins may also be the result of natural chemical reactions within our body- that is right, we produce our own toxic materials.

When we are exposed excessively to environmental toxins, our body struggles and is unable to keep up with the processing and eliminating. Much like when a machine is over worked, it either stops output altogether or slows down to become inefficient.

What do we do to encourage detoxification?

To counteract this breakdown, we need a steady balance of dietary:

  • antioxidants -specifically zinc, copper, vitamin C, glutathione
  • nutrients – such as amino acids, vitamins B
  • minerals magnesium and iron

These dietary inclusions with help to nurture our detoxifying organs.

The main organs of detoxification being the liver, kidneys, skin and lungs.

*note- everyone’s requirements for the mentions vitamins and minerals vary as each person is unique. If the diet holds variety and nutritional substance, additional intakes of these may not be necessary.

Other non-nutritive detoxing aids may be:

  • Intermittent fasting – fasting allows the digestive system to catch a break and work on waste elimination.
  • Exercise – sweat is not only a strategy to cool our body down but it releases toxins through our skin. Exercise also helps to circulate toxins to the appropriate organs for effective detoxification.

What could the consequences be if we don’t assist our body to detox?

Without these dietary supports we may develop consequential:

  • gastrointestinal problems
  • chronic fatigue
  • aches and pains
  • skin conditions (eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis)
  • weight gain
  • immune breakdown
  • mood disorders (depression, anxiety, irritability, rage)
  • learning and behavioural issues
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • neurological complaints
  • poor cardiovascular health
  • fatty liver
  • hormonal dysregulation
  • fibromyalgia
  • triggering of autoimmune conditions

How do our organs detox?

Our skin sweats out toxic materials, sheds, causes other eruptions to pushes them out through pimples and acne – ever had a breakout after a big night or wondered why we sweat with fever?

Our kidneys send toxins our through our urine – this is one reason it is vital to drink plenty of water throughout the day.

The liver processes materials and excretes through the urine, skin and faeces. It is our most important organ of detoxification as almost everything we eat, drink, inhale and put on our body is sent through our liver.

Our lungs send out Co2 gases from our blood and lungs.

The digestive tract eliminates toxic foods by promoting vomiting, diarrhoea or normal bowel motions.

Because our body relies on us to get arm it with the appropriate tools for effective detoxification it is important to ensure we are consuming sufficient amounts of healthy fats, lean proteins, fruits, vegetables and fibre to enhance and optimise its detoxing functions. Some great detoxing and antioxidant foods include:

  • asparagus
  • fresh beetroot
  • granny smith apples
  • ginger
  • turmeric
  • green leafy vegetables
  • lemons, grapefruit
  • garlic
  • green tea
  • capsicum
  • cucumber
  • broccoli sprouts
  • nuts and seeds

Include these into your daily routine and watch the magic happen!

Keto Buzz: What is it all about?

The Keto Buzz

The buzz word in the diet realm currently seems to ring ‘Keto’. There are so many FAD diets around and so many that have come and gone over the many years that people have been ‘weight’ conscious. Most diets have their pros and cons and it is evident ‘diet’ is not a one size fits all protocol and the ‘Keto diet’ is no exception.

So, what is it?

There are several forms of the ketogenic diet geared towards different people including: Standard ketogenic diet: Very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat. Cyclical ketogenic diet: Phases of higher-carb reloads with majority ketogenic days (5:2). Targeted ketogenic diet: Carbs are consumed around workout times. High-protein ketogenic diet: The standard Keto diet with additional protein.

The most common however, is the standard very low-carb, high fat concept, where protein is left at a moderate intake. The diet is time consuming and leaves people open to obsessing over their ‘macros’. Counting total carbohydrate intake is the aim of the game. You can see how this may become problematic for those with eating disorders or addictive behaviours.

The goal is less than 50g of net (total minus fibre) carbs per day. In doing this, you are working towards the primary target of regearing where energy is derived from. Therefore, as glucose is our main energy source on a normal diet, our bodies will begin to utilise or create other energy sources, ‘ketones’ which are produced in the liver from the breakdown of fatty acids, essentially accelerating fat metabolism and weightloss.

Possible Benefits

– Ketosis has beneficial effects on blood sugar and may, benefit ‘some’ of the diabetic community along with other related blood sugar dysregulation conditions.

– It has been shown to benefit some with neurological disorders (epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s).

– It has shown benefits in sustaining healthy blood lipid levels for cholesterol control (when the correct fats are also consumed)

– Supports happy hormone levels and other hormonal related conditions

– Effective for some who wish to lose weight, if done properly.

On the flipside if poorly executed or with a lack of professional guidance, nutritional deficiencies can arise, hypoglycaemia may present, a temporary energy loss may leave one unable to live a normal life and too much weightloss may present.

What I suggest… Do lots of reading and research before you jump into any diet regime and seek the guidance of an extensively trained professional who can educate, support, guide and monitor your health.

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice

Cauliflower is extremely versatile and can be swapped out for cheeses in baked dishes or for rice.

Not to mention it is extremely nutritious!

Minty Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

1 head large cauliflower chopped in a blender or grated to resemble rice.

I added ¼ cup of mint into the blender but you can shred it and mix it through if grating.

1 cup thinly chopped green spring onion

2 cups mixed green, yellow, orange and red capsicumClinical Dietitian

250g roasted pumpkin cubed (optional)

½ head broccoli broken up into tiny florets

4 button mushrooms or other Asian mushrooms to mix it up

4 garlic cloves diced

1 onion diced

1 chicken breast roasted with olive oil, salt and pepper and cubed after being cooked.

2 tbsp. good quality tamarind soy sauce.

5 anchovies chopped up (you don’t taste them but they are optional)

Black pepper to taste

A handful of pepitas

Handful of cashews

 

Add garlic, onion, caClinical Nutritionpsicum, mushrooms into a wok with 2 tbsp olive oil and sauté until fragrant.

Add cauliflower mint rice mixture and mix through until evenly distributed. 

Add in broccoli, diced chicken, anchovies and pepper. Stir through.

Add in the tamarind soy sauce and stir through until the whole batch turns a slightly brownish colour, as pictured.

Serve in a shallow bowl topped with pepitas and cashews.

 

 

IBS: Gut Problems Got You Beat?

Diet Consultation IBS

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Do you suffer from the following?

IBS

Gas
Bloating
Sore or upset stomach
Fatigue
Nausea
Irritability
Reflux or heartburn

Digestive Enzymes and IBS Type Symptoms

If you are suffering from one or more of the above digestive complaints, it is possible that you are lacking vital enzymes.

Digestive enzymes play a pivotal role in how the food we eat is broken down, digested, absorbed and used. These special little fellows occupy our digestion from our mouth (tongue) right through to our large intestine.

They are also present within our blood, assisting in anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic reactions, but that is a topic for another time.

Many things are known to deplete the number of digestive enzymes we secrete including, insufficient/incorrect pH environment for their survival and activation, tissue trauma to a secreting organ such as the pancreas, chemicals and pesticides stripping them from our plant foods, medications, drinking around food times, excessive intake of saturated and hydrogenated fats, fluorinated water, microwaving foods, heavy metals, dental fillings and pasteurisation.

As you can see, what happens to our foods has a lot to do with the number of enzymes that are viable to our body.

There are certain foods that are naturally designed to possess larger qualities of enzymes, but sometimes, eating enough of these at each meal can be a difficult task.

Sometimes the use of digestive enzyme supplements can fill this dietary gap.

But which enzymes are best for you? When do you take them? There are so many on the market, which provide the most benefit to your symptoms? It is important to speak with a dietary specialist to help determine the best fit for dietary intake of enzymatic foods as well as supplementation.

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